Mystery Menu Item for Monday, 29 July

Let’s play a game.  I’m going to list some items I’d like you buy.  When I get home from work tomorrow evening, I’ll tell you what were going to make and we can make it together.  How does that sound?  I think it’ll be fun!

 

Okay, here are the things you’ll need.
1 rotisserie chicken (get a large one)
6 limes
1 fresh coconut (if you can find one) or a bag of grated, unsweetened coconut)
6 stalks green onions
salt
all purpose flour
coconut milk
sugar
baking powder
melted butter
cream of coconut (the kind for mixed drinks)
rolling pin

Have you guessed what we’re going to make yet?  I’ll bet you have!  Leave a comment below with your guess.  Let’s see how many of you have it right.

Lumpia

Lumpia is a staple at most Chamorro gatherings.  There are fried and fresh versions, both of which are extremely popular.

There are so many variations to the types of filling you can use.  I’ve used ground beef with vegetables, ground pork with vegetables, added noodles and diced potatoes to the mix, used shrimp (especially when making fresh lumpia), and for dessert, banana-brown sugar lumpia (or Turon).

Lumpia is delicious eaten as-is, without some type of dipping sauce.  But while I’m on the subject, let’s talk about some of my favorite lumpia dipping sauces: garlic-vinegar, garlic-lime-sugar-fish sauce (don’t knock this one until you try it), sweet and sour, and the ultimate Chamorro favorite–fina’denne’.

No matter what your filling or dipping sauce, this is sure to be a crowd-pleaser at your next gathering.

Click on the photos below for my recipe and step-by-step instructions for making Fried Meat-and-Vegetable Lumpia.

lumpia 1

lumpia 2

lumpia 3

lumpia 4

Pan de Leche

What is Pan de Leche, you ask?  Why, it’s only one of the most delicious types of bread around, that’s what!  🙂

Dinner Rolls

Pan de Leche © 2013 AnniesChamorroKitchen

Seriously, though, Pan de Leche is a sweet milk bread that is delicious with just about anything.  Eat it by itself, slathered with butter (honey butter is even better), or stuff it with your favorite luncheon meat.  Just eat it.  You’ll be in 7th Heaven if you do.  Trust me.

I made up a batch of Pan de Leche to take to a party today.  The photo below shows some ham, cheese and baby spinach sliders made with these rockin’ rolls.

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What was that…you’ve never baked yeast bread before?  Don’t worry.  I’ll created a whole new post on tips (click here) that will get you over your fear of yeast.

Anyhow, on to more important things–my Pan de Leche recipe.

This recipe yields about 1 9×13 pan, or roughly 2 dozen rolls.

Pan de Leche

pan de leche 2

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup pineapple juice
  • 1 tablespoon white, granulated sugar
  • 1 packet (or envelope) active dry yeast (or 2 1/4 teaspoons)
  • 1/2 cup milk (whole, low-fat or skim, it’s your choice)
  • 1/4 cup unsalted butter (or half a stick)
  • 1/3 cup white, granulated sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 large egg
  • 3 to 3 1/2 cups all-purpose flour (start out with 3 cups; you might not use it all)
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon vital wheat gluten
  • 1/2 stick melted butter (for brushing the rolls before and after baking)

DSC_0344     

Directions:

1.  In a microwave-safe cup or bowl, heat the pineapple juice for 30 seconds on high. Using an instant-read thermometer, let it cool until the temperature reaches 105 degrees. Stir in the 1 tablespoon sugar and packet of yeast.  Set aside for about 10 minutes to proof (it will get all bubbly).

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2.  In a microwave-safe cup or bowl, heat the milk and 1/4 cup butter (about one minute on 100% power). Stir in the 1/3 cup sugar and vanilla extract.  Allow the mixture to cool then mix in the egg.

  

  

3.  In the bowl of your stand mixer, place the flour, salt, and wheat gluten.

4.  Pour the milk mixture and the bubbly yeast mixture into the mixing bowl.  Using the dough hook on your stand mixer (I use a KitchenAid mixer) mix on low speed (setting #3 on a KitchenAid) until a dough forms.  The dough may still be sticky — this is perfectly okay; you want the dough to be a little sticky.  Keep mixing (kneading) for about 8 minutes.

  

DSC_0376  Dough ball

5.  After 8 minutes of kneading, place the dough into a greased or buttered bowl (you can spray the bowl with butter cooking spray).  Cover with plastic wrap then place in a warm place to rise until double in size.  The amount of time it takes to rise will depend on how warm it is where you’ve place the bowl of dough.  I usually turn my oven on to warm during the kneading process then turn it off just before placing the dough in it to rise.

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6.  After the dough has doubled, turn it out onto a clean surface and lightly punch it down.  Roll out 28 balls; place them in a buttered 9×13 pan, with 4 rows of 7 balls.  I find it best to use a kitchen scale to weigh exact proportions.  This way, each piece of dough is exactly the same size.  I first cut out 28 pieces of dough using a pastry/bench scraper; then I weighed each piece to 1.1 ounces (a few balls weighed 1.2 ounces).

It’s easy to get nicely rounded balls of dough using my foolproof method.  First, slightly flatten out a piece of dough.  Next, form a small circle with your pointer and thumb (like you’re making the “ok” sign).  Place the piece of dough underneath the circle and push it through, all the while making your circle smaller and smaller.  The dough you push through will form a nicely rounded ball.  Pinch the bottom of the ball closed.

*I have a video clip showing how this is done, which I’ll upload soon.

7.  Spray the tops of the rolls with butter cooking spray then cover with plastic wrap.  Place the pan in a warm place to rise again, until almost doubled.  When the rolls have almost doubled, remove from the oven (if that’s where your dough is rising).

pan de leche

8.  Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.  Gently brush the tops of the rolls with melted butter. Bake for 15 minutes or until golden brown on top.  Brush with more melted butter after the rolls are done.

pan de leche 2

Enjoy!

Latiya

Pronounced ‘la-tee-ja’, this is a classic Chamorro dessert.  A light, creamy, custard-like pudding topped with a generous sprinkling of ground cinnamon tops a layer of scrumptious cake.  I say ‘custard-like’ only because my version of Latiya contains NO eggs, unlike most of the variations of this recipe.

The cake options are endless, but my favorite, by far, is carrot cake, and not just any carrot cake, mind you, but a moist rich version made with carrots (of course), pineapples, raisins, and lots and lots of nuts!

Pound cake is another favorite for this, as is another classic Chamorro dessert:  Chamorro Cake.

The key to assembling this oh-so-yummy dessert is to put lots of space between the pieces of cake.  This way, you can pour the creamy latiya topping in between the nooks and crannies.  Oh, I’m drooling just thinking about it.

Here’s my recipe for “classic” latiya…give it a try.  I think you’ll like it!  🙂

If you are a coconut-lover like me, scroll on down for my coconut version of my latiya recipe.

Latiya

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The photo below contains my recipe for “regular” Latiya.  Click on the thumbnail below to open a full-sized version of the photo to view my recipe.

Latiya

 

Drumroll please…..and now for my Coconut Latiya Recipe.  You don’t want to miss out on this one.

Annie’s Coconut Latiya:

Latiya

Ingredients:

  • 1 Sara Lee pound cake (I use the smaller one and slice it about the width of my thumb)
  • 1 can evaporated milk
  • 1 can water (use milk can)
  • 2 cans coconut milk
  • 1 stick butter
  • 1/2 cup sugar (more or less to taste)
  • 1 tablespoon vanilla extract
  • 1 cup sweetened coconut flakes
  • 8 HEAPING teaspoons corn starch
  • Cinnamon

Directions:

  1. In a medium pan, combine the evaporated and coconut milk (reserve the can of water), butter, sugar, vanilla and coconut flakes. Cook over medium heat.
  2. Mix the cornstarch with the can of water. When the butter has melted, add the cornstarch/water mixture.
  3. Stir constantly with a whisk until the mixture comes to a boil; continue cooking for about a minute longer then immediately pour over pound cake.
  4. Sprinkle the top of the latiya with cinnamon then allow to cool.

Rosketti ~ a Chamorro cookie

I won’t lie to you…you WILL need to have a tall glass of milk or water when you eat these starchy Chamorro cookies.  It calls for an entire container of corn starch after all, but despite all that starch, this is a melt-in-your mouth cookie you won’t want to miss out on.

As a little girl, I remember going to rosaries just so that I can have some of these yummy cookies.  I’d CAREFULLY (they crumble easily) wrap a couple of them in a napkin to bring home for later.

Nowadays, you’d expect to pay a good chunk of change to buy some ready-made for you.  I used to love receiving the occasional care package with a Crab Biscuit can inside.  That was the telltale sign, the can, for it wasn’t biscuits inside, but Rosketti, carefully packed so as not to break any.  But even if they did break, I didn’t dare throw any crumbs away!  Oh no!  I’d scoop those little bits up and eat them with a spoon, it was like gold to me!

But that was about oh, maybe 25 years ago.  I’ve since learned to make these crumbly, melt-in-your-mouth delights myself.  Give it a try, but have that glass of milk handy.  Enjoy!  🙂

Click on each thumbnail below to open up a full-sized photo.

Rosketti 1

Rosketti 2

Rosketti 3

Rosketti 4

These are so fun to make with a cookie spritzer.  Oh, the fun shapes you can make!

ENJOY! 🙂

Rosketti

 

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