Archive for SEAFOOD

The Best Sashimi Ever

I love sashimi!

If you don’t care to eat raw fish, then I’m sorry, but this recipe is not for you.  BUT, you can share it with someone who does! 🙂

In the words of my daughter, “I love, love, love this! It’s almost as good as your tuna poki!”  That’s my picky-eater daughter, mind you.  She even eats the shredded RAW RADISH in this dish! YES!

Radish, you ask?  In sashimi?  Don’t knock it ’till you try it.

My inspiration is from this fantastic sushi restaurant in Vegas (sorry, folks, I can’t name the restaurant here), but if you’ve lived in Vegas before, you’ve probably been to or heard of this place — look at the photo below, recognize it yet? 😉

This recipe is all about the sauce, I think.  It’s my version of ponzu sauce.

Give my recipe a try.  I think you’ll like it.

 

The Best Sashimi Ever!

Ingredients:

Good quality ahi tuna, thinly sliced

1 bunch green onions

1 long white radish (the one below is called an Icicle Radish)

Sashimi Sauce:

The juice of 3 lemons and 2 limes

1/4 cup rice vinegar

1 cup soy sauce

1/4 cup mirin

1 small piece of dried kelp, about a 4-inch piece will do.  You can find this and the other ingredients for this recipe at most Asian markets.

2 packets dried bonito flakes (0.17 oz. per packet).  The kind I buy comes in a package that contains 5 of these packets.

1-inch piece ginger, grated

Cayenne pepper, about 1/4 teaspoon, more or less to taste.  I like using Cayenne — it dissolves easily, and it’s not too spicy.  Even my “little” one eats it.  Well, she’s not so little anymore, but she’s sooooo picky!

Kewpie mayonnaise.  Don’t substitute with regular mayo.  The main difference between Kewpie and regular mayo is that kewpie is made with the egg yolks only, whereas some regular mayos are made with either only egg whites or whole eggs.  Kewpie is also creamier and just a tad bit sweeter that regular mayo.  Anyhow…look for and use kewpie mayo for this dish (no subs).

Directions:

Rinse, peel, and grate the radish. I used a box grater, grating the radish on the side with the second smallest holes. Set aside.

Place the lemon and lime juices into a mixing bowl. I picked out the seeds before squeezing the juice out of them (I like leaving the pulp in the sauce). You can use squeeze the juice into a small strainer if you want to strain out the pulp.  You need about 1 cup of juice.  If you have smaller fruits and get less than a cup of juice, squeeze more juice out of either a lemon or lime (your preference) to get about a cup of juice.

Pour in the rice vinegar.

Add the soy sauce.

Add the mirin.

Add the dried kelp. Leave the pieces big — you’re going to remove this later.

Add the bonito flakes.

Add the grated ginger. Use fresh ginger — the powdered stuff just won’t taste the same.

Sprinkle in as much cayenne pepper as you like. You can also add in chopped hot chili peppers.

Mix to combine. Set the mixture aside. Let it sit for at least an hour to allow the flavors to meld. Use a fork to pick out the pieces of kelp; discard the kelp. If you want a smooth sauce, pour it into another bowl with a strainer over the top.

After an hour, place about 2 tablespoons of kewpie mayo into a shallow dish. Pour in 1 cup of the sauce mixture. (Refrigerate any unused sauce.)

Use a whisk or a fork to mix the kewpie mayo into the sauce mixture. I know, it doesn’t look very appetizing right now, but trust me…it’s delicious…so delicious you might just want to drink the sauce! 🙂

Place the shredded radish into the center of the dish.

Place thin slices of ahi tuna on top of the shredded radish.

Squeeze more kewpie mayo on top of the fish. Sprinkle sliced green onions on top. Drizzle more sauce over the fish. Optional: sprinkle smelt roe on top of it all.

Serve immediately (it’s delicious with steamed white rice) and ENJOY!

 

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Soy Ginger Tilapia

Tilapia is a great choice when you’re looking for a quick and easy (healthy too!) meal. With just 8 simple ingredients (including the fish), you can have this dish on your dinner table in less than 30 minutes!

For a healthier alternative, use low sodium soy sauce in place of the regular soy sauce and oyster sauce if you want to cut back on sodium.

Give my recipe a try. I think you’ll like it. 🙂

Soy-Ginger Tilapia

Ingredients:

16 small tilapia filets (I buy them frozen, skinned and deboned)

1 cup soy sauce

1/2 cup red wine vinegar

3 tablespoons oyster sauce

3 tablespoons honey

1 tablespoon minced garlic

1 tablespoon grated ginger

1 bunch green onions (about 7 stalks), thinly sliced

Directions:

Prepare the tilapia:

I buy my tilapia frozen. They come about 16 small filets to a bag, with each filet individually wrapped. If you buy the fish frozen like I do, thaw them out, then remove each filet from the wrapping. Rinse the filets then place them in a shallow baking dish. I use two 9×13″ baking pans, placing 8 filets in each one. It’s okay of the filets overlap a bit.

Now that you’ve prepared the fish, make the soy-ginger sauce.

It’s also a good time to preheat your oven to 375 degrees F.


Make the Soy Ginger Sauce:

In a small microwave-safe mixing bowl, combine the soy sauce, red wine vinegar, oyster sauce, honey, garlic, and ginger. Microwave the mixture for one minute — you want to heat the mixture so that you can easily dissolve the honey. After heating, stir with a fork to combine all the ingredients.

Add the green onions; stir to combine.

Pour the mixture over the tilapia filets. It may look like too much sauce, but trust me, you want the filets covered in the mixture so that it soaks into the fish during baking. That, and you’ll want some of the extra sauce to pour over your rice! 🙂

Bake the fish at 375 degrees F. for 12 to 15 minutes. This fish cooks fast, so check for doneness at the 12-minute mark. The fish is white, and flakes easily with a fork when done.

Serve with hot white rice, and don’t forget to pour some of the delicious soy-ginger sauce over the rice too!

ENJOY!

 

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Baked Salmon with Mushroom Cream Sauce

Salmon is one of my favorite varieties of fish. I love it anyway you prepare it — grill it with my teriyaki sauce, make fresh salmon kelaguen, or bake it in my creamy mushroom garlic sauce — I love it all.

This is a super simple recipe to make. It took minutes to prepare, and since salmon cooks quickly, you can have this dish on your table in minutes!

You can lighten up my recipe by using half and half or light whipping cream instead of heavy whipping cream. Here is an approximation of the percentage of fat in half and half, light cream, and heavy whipping cream.

  • Half-and-Half: 12% fat
  • Light Cream: 20% fat
  • Light Whipping Cream: 30% fat
  • Whipping Cream: 35% fat
  • Heavy Cream and Heavy Whipping Cream: 38% fat

On a separate note, I’ve been asked before where you find heavy whipping cream. You’ll find it in the dairy section of your grocery store, usually next to the refrigerated coffee creamer and milk. This is what the box looks like.

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Another healthier — and delicious — alternative to heavy whipping cream is to use coconut milk. Just watch the salmon as it bakes — don’t cook it to where the coconut milk begins to boil (boiled coconut milk tends to break down and separate). I recommend adding only enough of the sauce over the salmon to cover it. Set the remaining sauce (unbaked) aside until the salmon is done. Bake as directed then pour the reserved coconut milk and mushroom sauce over the cooked salmon. This way, you don’t have to worry about the coconut milk separating should it boil during the baking.

Give my recipe a try.  I think you’ll like it. 🙂

THM NOTE:

For THMs, this recipe makes about 6 servings, with about 2g of carbs per serving, making this an S meal.

Baked Salmon with Mushroom Cream Sauce

Ingredients:

  • 2 salmon filets (about 4 pounds)
  • 4 cups sliced mushrooms (this sounds like a lot, but it cooks down to half this amount)
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil (or butter)
  • 3 tablespoons minced garlic
  • 3 tablespoons Dashida seasoning OR 1 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1 bunch green onions, sliced
  • 2 cups heavy whipping cream

Directions:

Rinse the salmon filets and remove any bones that you can see or feel. Place the salmon, skin side down, in a 9×13 baking dish.

Prepare the mushroom cream sauce.

In a medium sauce pan, place the mushrooms, olive oil, garlic, Dashida (or sea salt) and black pepper.

Cook over medium high heat, stirring occassionally, until the the mushrooms have reduced in volume and have browned nicely.

Stir in the green onions.

Pour in the heavy whipping cream; stir to combine.

Cook the cream sauce for about a minute then remove from the heat.

Pour the sauce over the salmon filets.

Bake at 375 degrees for 15 minutes, or just until the salmon is done (when the salmon flakes easily with a fork). Do not over cook.

This version below was made with half coconut milk and half heavy cream, and cooked in one pan on the stovetop.  In a large skillet, prepare the mushroom cream sauce as directed.  Add the salmon filets to the pan, skin slide down, making sure the sauce almost covers the filets.  Scoop up the mushrooms and place them on top of the filets.  Cook over medium low heat for about 30 minutes, periodically scooping some sauce and pouring it over the filets as it cooks.

Serve with rice, over pasta, or with a large side salad and enjoy!

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Ahi Tuna Poke

Poke is a Hawaiian dish traditionally served as an appetizer, but it can also be a main dish when served with rice or corn titiyas.

Modern versions of poke can vary depending on the ingredients you have on hand.  Poke is typically made with cubed ahi tuna marinated with soy sauce (some use sea salt), ground kukui nut (the meat in the inside, though, not the entire nut), sesame oil, ogo seaweed, and hot chili peppers.  You can also use fresh salmon or octopus instead of ahi.

Living in Colorado, I don’t have access to a lot of the traditional ingredients like ogo seaweed and kukui nuts, so I created a different version of poke that my family — especially my 11 year old daughter — loves.

It’s a simple recipe that you can take to entirely new levels by adding the other optional ingredients I listed below.

Give my recipe a try.  I think you’ll like it. 🙂

Poke

Poki - 07

Ingredients:

  • 1 pound ahi tuna
  • 2 tablespoons sesame oil
  • 2 tablespoons kimchee base
  • 1/2 cup soy sauce
  • 6 stalks green onions, thinly sliced
  Optional Ingredients:
  • 1 small cucumber, diced
  • 1 cup cherry tomatoes, diced
  • 1 small sweet onion (Maui onions are good), diced
  • 2 tablespoons furikake seasoning
  • 2 tablespoons ground macadamia nuts (if you can’t find or don’t have access to kukui nuts)
  • 1 teaspoon minced garlic
  • Hot chili peppers or Sambal Oelek chili sauce, to taste
  • You can also substitute the tuna with salmon or octopus

Directions:

1.  Cut the ahi into small cubes.  I find it’s easier to slice the ahi when it’s partially frozen.

Poki - 01 Poki - 02

2.  Add the sesame oil.

Poki - 03

3.  Add the kimchee base (you can use a chili sauce like Sambal Oelek if you can’t find kimchee base).

Poki - 04

4.  Add the soy sauce.

Poki - 05

5.  Add the green onions.

Poki - 06

6.  Stir to combine.  Let the poke sit for at least 30 minutes (refrigerated) to allow the flavors to meld.

Poki - 07

7.  Serve with hot white rice or freshly made corn titiyas (tortillas).  The photo below shows the ahi tuna poke (on the bottom right of the plate) and ahi tuna sashimi (that’s another recipe, to be posted soon) on the bottom left.

ENJOY!!

Poki - 08

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Fresh Salmon Kelaguen

Kelaguen in Chamorro describes a dish that’s prepared by mixing the main ingredient (usually chicken, beef, deer, or seafood) with lemon or lime juice, onions, salt, and hot pepper.  Chicken kelaguen is usually prepared with cooked (grilled, broiled or boiled) chicken.  The other types of kelaguen–beef, deer, shrimp, and various types of fish–are most often prepared raw, with the meat or seafood getting cooked with the addition of an acid, usually lemon or lime juice.

Kelaguen is a staple dish at Chamorro parties.  Sometimes, especially on Guam, an entire table is devoted to several types of kelaguen.

Salmon kelaguen is a favorite in our house.  I know, I know…I’ve said a lot of the dishes I make are favorites.  But really…this one is a REAL favorite (after shrimp kelaguen, that is). 😉

I prefer fresh salmon with this recipe.  If you’re in a pinch, canned salmon kelaguen is also tasty, but I still prefer fresh salmon any day.

Give my recipe a try.  If you like sushi, ceviche, or any type of kelaguen, then I know you’ll like this. 😀

Fresh Salmon Kelaguen 

Salmon Kelaguen - Annie's

Ingredients:

  • 2 pounds fresh salmon (red salmon, preferably)
  • 4 stalks green onions, sliced
  • The juice of 5-6 limes, more or less, to taste (or you can use lemon powder, mixed with a little bit of water)
  • Salt, to taste
  • 1 cup cherry or grape tomatoes, diced
  • Hot pepper, optional

Directions:

1.  Rinse the salmon filet.  Pull out any salmon bones.  Remove the skin, or leave it on if you prefer.  I like the skin removed for kelaguen.

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2.  Cut the salmon into small pieces.

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3.  Thinly slice the green onions.

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4.  Mix the salmon and green onions together in a small bowl.

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5.  Squeeze about 1 cup of lime juice over the salmon and onions.  Sprinkle salt over the mixture; start with about 1 teaspoon.  Stir gently to combine all the ingredients and to dissolve the salt into the lime juice.  Add more or less lime juice and/or salt, to taste.

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6.  Stir in the diced tomatoes.  Optional:  Add hot pepper, as much as you like.  Serve with hot rice or titiyas.  ENJOY!

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